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Flyer for Malajuste at UPR Flyer for Malajuste at UPR Photo/Foto: Photo/Foto: David Ferri; Design/Diseño: V.V.E.A.D.R.
  • Title: Malajuste
  • Alternate Title: Malajuste- piezas de movimiento
  • Holdings: program, video (HIDVL)
  • Duration: 00:59:22
  • Language: English, Spanish
  • Date: Sept 1990
  • Location: Anfiteatro Julia de Burgos Universidad de Puerto Rico, Recinto de Río Piedras
  • Type-Format: dance
  • Cast: Viveca Vázquez, Eduardo Alegría & Dorcas Román
  • Credits: Concepto y coreografía: Viveca Vázquez Mast-Urbana Texto: Viveca Vázquez Cámara: Eduardo Alegría Tercera Lavada – Mira y qué Fílmico: Marimater O’Neill Nacedós Video: Viveca Vázquez, Yuisa Buxeda Edición: Sonia Fritz Vistas fijas: Yuisa Buxeda, Marimater O’Neill Vieques no es un pescao Videos en colaboración con: Eduardo Alegría, Mari Martín, Pilar Alamo, David Ferri, Dorcas Román, Teresa Hernández, Eva Vásquez y Rayza Vidal Costura: Jerry Grabaciones: Roberto Guzmán (WRTU) Cámara: Marco Quiñones, Osvaldo Rivera, Roberto González Sonido: Norberto Aponte Boom: David Ferri Video: Rosa Orengo Videotape: Richard Colón Videográficas: Rosa Orengo Edición: Richard Colón, Norberto Aponte Productora: Viveca Vázquez Productor ejecutivo: Rafael García Director técnico: Norberto Aponte Director para television: Norberto Aponte

Malajuste (1990)

Video documentation of Viveca Vázquez’ Puerto Rican experimental dance performance Malajuste (Maladjustment). Malajuste is a Taller de Otra Cosa’s proposal, created as a collective collaboration with a group of young people to work on dance, and to develop a space of co-creation, exploration, and study.

This performance includes four pieces: The first one, Mast-urbana, plays with sexuality topics, and gender roles, in a society marked by taboo. The video insert explores topics such as sexuality, religion, masturbation, and guilt, and the relationship with the own body; the presence of this video also points out the role of visuality in our body self-perception. The second piece, Mira y qué questions pre-concepts of what a masculine body might be, and subverts the relationship between the masculine and the feminine. The feminine ‘voice’ is also questioned through the resource of lip-synching. The third piece, Nacedós contrasts quotidian movement vs. very oppressive sound. In this manner, the piece proposes one of the main concerns of this performance: how to ‘adjust’? How does the language of the body adjust to external inputs, like sound; and also to ‘constructed’ inputs, like gender roles, or visuality? Finally, the last piece, Vieques no es un pescao is dedicated to Vieques Island and Puerto Rico, and their resistance against army tests by the US military. This island is referred as a zone of disaster; however, the question about which force is more harmful, the natural forces or the human forces -- with their political and economical greed -- remains open. With this last part, the idea of “adjustment” involves a political turn and a component of social concern that includes Puerto Rico in the reflection presented on stage.

 


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